BODY LANGUAGE

CIRCLING AND SNIFFING
The universal dog greeting, it starts nose to nose and proceeds to the other end – if not discouraged your husky could do this with humans as well.

MOUNTING
Mounting another dog or attempting to mount a person is not usually a sexual behaviour. It is an indication of dominance (though not in the use of the term: dominance theory), who is higher and who has power over the others. (Although this can also be just play behaviour).


PAWING
A dog who places his paw on the shoulder of another dog is tying
to "get one over" that dog. (This also can be just play behaviour). This
can also be seen when one dog try’s placing his chin over the top of the other.


BOWING
A Siberian who crouches down, wagging his tail quickly, wants to
play.

NUDGING OR PUNCHING
A husky who nudges or punches with his nose is trying to get you to play with him. It is more forceful than the bowing motion, in that he is demanding your attention and not asking for it by bowing.


HAND HOLDING
A sign of affection, your husky may take your hand in his mouth holding it gently. He is showing you his affection and asking you to trust that he will not bite you. This is a good bonding strategy and allowing him to do so shows that you have faith in him.


MOUTH LICKING
This is a care-soliciting behaviour and is how young puppies seek food from their mothers. The behaviour often persists into adulthood.


LICKING OR TAIL CHEWING
This is often a nervous response, however chewing the base of the tail can also mean he has fleas. If licking behaviour continues for weeks with no apparent cause, especially if carried to the point of raw or bleeding paws, suspect obsessive-compulsive behaviour (just like the disorder in human beings). It is important to discuss this behaviour with your Veterinarian.


HEAD TILTING
Generally this quizzical look means he is puzzled or curious about something.

Pawing at his face or rubbing on carpet.  This can mean he is just itchy.  After a meal huskies will often rub their face against something to clean themselves. Constant rubbing may indicate an allergy.


KNOWING YOUR HUSKYS TAIL
Siberians generally relax and pull sleds with their tails down. Excitement causes their tails to curl up and a dragging tail means he is tired. When a dog wags his tail: A slower incomplete wag from an erect tail may
indicate tension. A tail held between the legs is complete submission or fear.


SLEEPING STYLES
Dogs sleep a lot, over 14 hours a day. In cold weather the Siberian does what is known as the Siberian swirl, carefully tucking his tender nose under his furry tail for warmth.


A husky curled snugly close beside you is probably not so much interested in keeping warm (he’s hotter than you are) as he is keeping safe. If he’s a confident dog you may notice that the keeps himself a little distant from you – just a few inches. He wants to be secure, but at the same time he is letting you know that he is perfectly capable of handling anything that comes up.

If your husky prefers to take his ease flat on his back, legs in the air, you may take comfort in knowing that you have supremely confident, friendly dog without a care in the world.

A Siberian laying flat on his stomach, legs sprawled in every direction is probably hot and trying to cool down.

A dreaming dog exhibits the same rapid eye movement found in people, do not disturb a dreaming dog. You may be walking right into his nightmare; the gentlest dog in the world has been known to snap if awakened at the wrong time.


WHAT IS MY DOG SAYING
We would like to say that the above descriptions should NOT be mixed up or confused with the"Calming Signals" that dogs use. A brief, (slightly funny) and informative introduction to these "Calming Signals" is shown in the image below.

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